Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Podcast Marketing – How to Promote Your Business Using Podcasts

Podcasting is blogging with audio instead of text. Essentially, you post an MP3 file instead of an article.

5 Reasons Why Podcasts Are Great
1. An increasing number of people are downloading new podcasts every day.
2. Unlike TV, podcast can be played whenever the listener wants.
3. People can listen to them in their cars on their way to work or when they go for a run. You will get their full attention.
4. There is a lot less competition in the podcast market than there is in the article market.
5. Podcasting is a lot easier and less time-consuming than blogging and getting your articles published.

5 Steps to Producing a Podcast
1. Download Audacity at http://audacity.sourceforge.net/download/ or any other audio editing tool.
2. Get a good microphone.
3. Write the script (so the podcast doesn't sound improvised and amateurish).
4. Record it in a noise-free environment.
5. Apply the noise-reduction filter in your audio editing software and save the podcast file.

Where You Can Submit Your Podcast
PodOMatic - http://www.podomatic.com/
Podcast Alley - http://www.podcastalley.com/index.php
iTunes - http://www.itunes.com/
Yahoo Podcasts - http://podcasts.yahoo.com/
Digg Podcasts - http://digg.com/podcasts
Podcast Directory - http://www.podcastdirectory.com/
Podcast Pickle - http://www.podcastpickle.com/
PodFeed - http://www.podfeed.net/
Odeo - http://www.odeo.com/
Digital Podcast - http://www.digitalpodcast.com/
Podcast.net - http://www.podcast.net/
Singing Fish - http://search.singingfish.com/sfw/home.jsp
Blog Universe - http://www.bloguniverse.com/
All Podcasts - http://www.allpodcasts.com/
Big Contact - http://www.bigcontact.com/
Collectik - http://collectik.net/collectik/
PodNova - http://www.podnova.com/
PodTech - http://www.podtech.net/home/

Podcast Marketing – How to Promote Your Business Using Podcasts

Podcasting is blogging with audio instead of text. Essentially, you post an MP3 file instead of an article.

5 Reasons Why Podcasts Are Great
1. An increasing number of people are downloading new podcasts every day.
2. Unlike TV, podcast can be played whenever the listener wants.
3. People can listen to them in their cars on their way to work or when they go for a run. You will get their full attention.
4. There is a lot less competition in the podcast market than there is in the article market.
5. Podcasting is a lot easier and less time-consuming than blogging and getting your articles published.

5 Steps to Producing a Podcast
1. Download Audacity at http://audacity.sourceforge.net/download/ or any other audio editing tool.
2. Get a good microphone.
3. Write the script (so the podcast doesn't sound improvised and amateurish).
4. Record it in a noise-free environment.
5. Apply the noise-reduction filter in your audio editing software and save the podcast file.

Where You Can Submit Your Podcast
PodOMatic - http://www.podomatic.com/
Podcast Alley - http://www.podcastalley.com/index.php
iTunes - http://www.itunes.com/
Yahoo Podcasts - http://podcasts.yahoo.com/
Digg Podcasts - http://digg.com/podcasts
Podcast Directory - http://www.podcastdirectory.com/
Podcast Pickle - http://www.podcastpickle.com/
PodFeed - http://www.podfeed.net/
Odeo - http://www.odeo.com/
Digital Podcast - http://www.digitalpodcast.com/
Podcast.net - http://www.podcast.net/
Singing Fish - http://search.singingfish.com/sfw/home.jsp
Blog Universe - http://www.bloguniverse.com/
All Podcasts - http://www.allpodcasts.com/
Big Contact - http://www.bigcontact.com/
Collectik - http://collectik.net/collectik/
PodNova - http://www.podnova.com/
PodTech - http://www.podtech.net/home/

Friday, December 12, 2008

How to Command Respect through Body Language

Some people are the center of attention wherever they go. They’re not glamorous movie stars, just ordinary people with excellent command over their body language. Here are some pointers to help you emulate these confident people and command respect from those around you. It may not work well in all countries, who are wearing a big attire or robe etc.

Improve your standing…

Posture can say a lot about a person. Confident people seem to naturally stand tall, while those who slouch look like they’re down on themselves. Be sure that you’re presenting yourself in a way that commands respect.

What to do:

1. Stand tall, even if you’re the shortest person in the room. Keeping your shoulders pushed back will lend you an air of confidence.
2. Spread your weight evenly on both feet instead of leaning on one. You don’t need to stand at perfect attention, just keep your feet apart so you balance well.
3. Take your hands out of your pockets, or you may be seen like you’ve got something to hide. Hold them loosely by your side.
4. Stand with your arms crossed behind your back. Your shoulders will get pulled back automatically.

What not to do:

5. Don’t stand with your hands on your hips if you don’t want to come across as confrontational.
6. Don’t shuffle your feet. Pick your feet up and move like you know where you’re going.
7. Don’t fidget with your feet. Drawing patterns with one foot on the floor shows you’re not interested in what’s going on.
8. Don’t lean against walls or tables. You’ll appear tired and lazy.
9. Don’t turn away from the person you’re talking to in the middle of the conversation, otherwise you’ll show you’re not interested in continuing it.

Eye contact…

When holding a conversation, the person you’re speaking with should focus on your eyes. They indicate your emotions and can show whether you’re paying attention or not. Be considerate of what your eyes tell about you: show others respect and you’ll get respect in return.

What to do:

10. Look directly at the person you are talking to in order to exude confidence.

What not to do:

11. Don’t shift your attention to other people or things in the room. It shows deceit.
12. Be careful not to glare at the person talking to you. You may think you look intensely interested, but you just look mad.
13. Don’t blink excessively. People will be distracted and wonder if there’s something wrong with you.
14. If you wear glasses, don’t look over the rim. It makes you look condescending.
15. Never wear sunglasses inside, especially during a meeting. Others will wonder if you have something to hide.
16. Don’t look at your watch unless you want to appear as if you’re in a rush.
17. Don’t rub your eyes with your hands: it signals disbelief at the situation.
18. When you pinch the bridge of your nose with your eyes closed, you’ll come across in a negative manner.
19. Keeping your eyes on the door will show that you’re ready to leave the room.

Sitting pretty…

Your posture while sitting is just as important as standing. Your level of interest in a conversation can be easily read by the position you sit in. Be careful to position yourself in a way that shows you’re powerful and actively engaged in what others have to say.

What to do:

20. Sit straight so that your shoulders touch the back of your chair. Slouching promotes the image of laziness.
21. Rest your hands on the arms of your chair, place them on your knees, or fold them on your lap so that they are not a distraction.
22. Make sure your chair is positioned so you’re facing the person you’re talking to. This will show that you’re engaged in what they are saying.
23. Lean slightly forward to appear interested in a conversation and stress what you’re saying.

What not to do:

24. Don’t cross your ankles. Some people think it’s a sign that you’ve got something to hide. Sit on your feet on the floor to minimize distractions.
25. Don’t tilt your chair back so that it’s standing on two legs. This shows a very casual, laid back attitude and does not earn you respect. You also run the risk of looking silly when you accidentally fall backwards.
26. Don’t cross your arms across your body. You may come across as disinterested.
27. Stretching your legs out shows you’re too relaxed and may also invade others’ personal space.
28. Never put your feet up on the desk in front of you. You don’t want to come across as condescending.
29. Ladies, be cautious when crossing your legs. If you’ll expose things that are better left to the imagination, refrain from doing so.

Heading for victory…

The position of your head, the frequency of your breaths, even yawning are indicators of your level of interest in a conversation.

Take care to avoid looking as if you’re bored or disinterested. If you seem to be involved in what others have to say, they will naturally offer the same to you and build mutual respect.

What to do:

30. Tilting your head to one side during a conversation shows you’re interested and thinking about what’s being said.
31. Take regular, even breaths. Heavy breaths are a sure sign that you’re nervous.
32. Be sure to nod your head so the person you’re speaking with knows you’re listening and interested.

What not to do:

33. Massaging your temples shows you’re either at your wits’ end or that you have a severe headache.
34. Don’t swallow too often; it gives away the fact that you’re not comfortable with the situation.
35. Yawning is an involuntary sign from your body saying that your brain’s bored. You may not have control over it, but yawning in the middle of a conversation will give away the fact that you’d rather be somewhere else.
36. A blank face conveys either disinterest or a lack of understanding.

Walking into the limelight…

Carrying yourself in a confident manner is key to commanding respect. Give the impression that you’re walking with a purpose so

that you’ll be admired by others.

What to do:

37. Walk, don’t run. Take even strides.
38. Look ahead or in front of you, not at the floor when you walk.

What not to do:

39. Don’t walk with a swagger; it indicates that you’re cocky and have an attitude.
40. Be careful not to shove people aside as you move across a crowded place: no one respects a rude person.
41. Similarly, avoid stepping on others’ toes.

Win, hands down…

Hand gestures are great for getting attention or making a point, but be sure that you’re not creating a distraction. You want attention to be on your eyes and face while speaking, not on what your hands are doing. Command respect and control the interest of the conversation by keeping your hands in check.

What to do:

42. Open, face-up palms signal honesty and straightforwardness.
43. Gesturing with your arms can help you make a point, but don’t do so much that it’s distracting.
44. When you stroke your chin, it shows you’re trying to make a decision. Be sure that you want others to know that’s what you’re doing.
45. Making a steeple out of your hands makes a good impression, as it demonstrates confidence.
46. Shake hands firmly: not too tight or too limp. You don’t want to crush the other person’s hands or come across as unsure of yourself.
47. If the situation calls for paperwork, be sure to keep your papers in order with easy access to avoid looking disorganized.
48. Make sure your palms are clean and dry. Sweaty palms indicate nervousness and are a turn off for most people.
49. If you’re trying to convince someone of your sincerity, touch your open palm to your heart.
50. Rolling up your sleeves signals a casual, get-down-to-work attitude. Roll them up or down according to the situation.
51. Removing your tie, top button, or jacket to indicate you’re getting comfortable in your surroundings.

What not to do:

52. Don’t clench your fists. You’ll come off as aggressive.
53. Never point at someone, be it the person talking to you or anyone else in the room. It’s rude.
54. Don’t play or fidget with your mobile phone when someone’s talking to you. It shows avoidance and a lack of interest.
55. Don’t wring your hands: it signals despair.
56. Don’t scratch your head. You’ll come across as being unsure of yourself.
57. Don’t touch your nose, play with your hair, or rub your eyes when you’re being asked for an honest answer. They’re all signs that say you’re lying.
58. Don’t tap your fingers on a table or arms of a chair; you’ll seem anxious.
59. Don’t run your fingers through your hair. It shows frustration.
60. Don’t doodle on the notepad in front of you, as this indicates boredom.
61. Closing an open mouth with your hands shows you’re shocked at what’s been said or what you’ve seen.
62. Never bite your nails. It will make you seem nervous.
63. Don’t fidget with objects lying on the table in front of you.
64. Don’t chew on a pencil or pen when talking to someone. It’s unattractive and distracting.
65. Don’t sit with your palms on your cheeks. It shows you’re deep in thought about something else.
66. Don’t clench the arms of your chair or your handbag too tightly. You’ll portray yourself as nervous.
67. Don’t rub your hands together: it shows you’re too eager.
68. Avoid a two-handed handshake. It’s usually connected to politicians who are not very sincere.
69. Do not wipe your palms on your clothing. Use a handkerchief instead.
70. If you pull at your ear, you may indicate that you’re lying.
71. Don’t shake your fists at someone, as it is extremely aggressive.
72. Clenched fists raised in the air will indicate that you’re overjoyed or thrilled. Avoid doing this when situations call for restraint.

A matter of manners…

Practicing common courtesy is a basis for earning respect from others. If you’re rude, people will avoid talking and working with you. Be polite to ensure you’re putting your best foot forward.

What to do:

73. When you need to offer comfort, a one-armed squeeze, gentle hug, or a pat on the shoulder helps, depending on how close you are to the other person.
74. Open doors and allow others to walk before you.
75. Cough and sneeze into your hands or a handkerchief, not into the face of the people around you.

What not to do:

76. A handshake that goes on for an extended period of time may be considered inappropriate.
77. Ruffling someone’s hair may seem like you’re being genuinely affectionate, but in a formal setting, it suggests you’re being

condescending.
78. Don’t shout when you’re on the phone. Talk in a calm, volume-controlled voice.
79. Don’t huddle into a corner with your mobile phone while in a crowd of people. Get out and mingle instead. Keep your private conversations for a time when you’re alone.
80. Don’t mock someone’s mannerisms when you think they’re not watching.
81. Avoid taking a phone call when you’re in the middle of a discussion.
82. If you have a cold, don’t blow your nose loudly in public.
83. Never wipe your nose with your hands or sleeves.
84. Don’t scratch your itches, not matter how much you’re tempted to. You’ll make people wonder if you have a rash.
85. Don’t multi-task in the middle of a conversation. It doesn’t show dexterity, only callousness.
86. Don’t slam doors, no matter how angry you are.
87. Don’t snap or clap your hands to call someone over.
88. Don’t burp/belch loudly in public.
89. Don’t lick your lips too often. You may jut be wetting them, but it indicates nervousness, or worse, sexual aggression.
90. Don’t make faces or stick your tongue out behind someone’s back. It’s childish and rude.

Take a good look at yourself…

Carefully examining the way you present yourself can help you discover areas in which you may need improvement. Carefully groom your mannerisms and outward appearance to make your best impression and command respect.

What to do:

91. Practice your mannerisms in front of a mirror so that you can discover your weak areas.
92. Additionally, try videotaping your actions so you can find out where you’re going wrong.
93. Look at others who command respect and imitate their actions.
94. Look good. You don’t have to be conventionally handsome or beautiful; it’s enough to dress neatly in clothes that suit both you and the occasion.
95. Smell good. Use deodorant and perfume, but go easy on it. You don’t want to overpower the room with your scent.
96. Keep your fingernails clean. Close cropped nails show you’re neat and orderly, but if you prefer to wear them long, make sure they’re groomed neatly.
97. Wear footwear that allows you to walk comfortably to avoid making a fool of yourself.
98. Keep your work area and personal space neat and tidy. Avoid clutter and dust.

What not to do:

99. Avoid revealing, dirty or wrinkled clothing.
100. Don’t wear too much makeup. Keep it to a minimum.

101. And last, but not least, always smile. Smiles are contagious. When you smile, others can’t help but smile back and feel positively towards you. ;-)

How to Command Respect through Body Language

Some people are the center of attention wherever they go. They’re not glamorous movie stars, just ordinary people with excellent command over their body language. Here are some pointers to help you emulate these confident people and command respect from those around you. It may not work well in all countries, who are wearing a big attire or robe etc.

Improve your standing…

Posture can say a lot about a person. Confident people seem to naturally stand tall, while those who slouch look like they’re down on themselves. Be sure that you’re presenting yourself in a way that commands respect.

What to do:

1. Stand tall, even if you’re the shortest person in the room. Keeping your shoulders pushed back will lend you an air of confidence.
2. Spread your weight evenly on both feet instead of leaning on one. You don’t need to stand at perfect attention, just keep your feet apart so you balance well.
3. Take your hands out of your pockets, or you may be seen like you’ve got something to hide. Hold them loosely by your side.
4. Stand with your arms crossed behind your back. Your shoulders will get pulled back automatically.

What not to do:

5. Don’t stand with your hands on your hips if you don’t want to come across as confrontational.
6. Don’t shuffle your feet. Pick your feet up and move like you know where you’re going.
7. Don’t fidget with your feet. Drawing patterns with one foot on the floor shows you’re not interested in what’s going on.
8. Don’t lean against walls or tables. You’ll appear tired and lazy.
9. Don’t turn away from the person you’re talking to in the middle of the conversation, otherwise you’ll show you’re not interested in continuing it.

Eye contact…

When holding a conversation, the person you’re speaking with should focus on your eyes. They indicate your emotions and can show whether you’re paying attention or not. Be considerate of what your eyes tell about you: show others respect and you’ll get respect in return.

What to do:

10. Look directly at the person you are talking to in order to exude confidence.

What not to do:

11. Don’t shift your attention to other people or things in the room. It shows deceit.
12. Be careful not to glare at the person talking to you. You may think you look intensely interested, but you just look mad.
13. Don’t blink excessively. People will be distracted and wonder if there’s something wrong with you.
14. If you wear glasses, don’t look over the rim. It makes you look condescending.
15. Never wear sunglasses inside, especially during a meeting. Others will wonder if you have something to hide.
16. Don’t look at your watch unless you want to appear as if you’re in a rush.
17. Don’t rub your eyes with your hands: it signals disbelief at the situation.
18. When you pinch the bridge of your nose with your eyes closed, you’ll come across in a negative manner.
19. Keeping your eyes on the door will show that you’re ready to leave the room.

Sitting pretty…

Your posture while sitting is just as important as standing. Your level of interest in a conversation can be easily read by the position you sit in. Be careful to position yourself in a way that shows you’re powerful and actively engaged in what others have to say.

What to do:

20. Sit straight so that your shoulders touch the back of your chair. Slouching promotes the image of laziness.
21. Rest your hands on the arms of your chair, place them on your knees, or fold them on your lap so that they are not a distraction.
22. Make sure your chair is positioned so you’re facing the person you’re talking to. This will show that you’re engaged in what they are saying.
23. Lean slightly forward to appear interested in a conversation and stress what you’re saying.

What not to do:

24. Don’t cross your ankles. Some people think it’s a sign that you’ve got something to hide. Sit on your feet on the floor to minimize distractions.
25. Don’t tilt your chair back so that it’s standing on two legs. This shows a very casual, laid back attitude and does not earn you respect. You also run the risk of looking silly when you accidentally fall backwards.
26. Don’t cross your arms across your body. You may come across as disinterested.
27. Stretching your legs out shows you’re too relaxed and may also invade others’ personal space.
28. Never put your feet up on the desk in front of you. You don’t want to come across as condescending.
29. Ladies, be cautious when crossing your legs. If you’ll expose things that are better left to the imagination, refrain from doing so.

Heading for victory…

The position of your head, the frequency of your breaths, even yawning are indicators of your level of interest in a conversation.

Take care to avoid looking as if you’re bored or disinterested. If you seem to be involved in what others have to say, they will naturally offer the same to you and build mutual respect.

What to do:

30. Tilting your head to one side during a conversation shows you’re interested and thinking about what’s being said.
31. Take regular, even breaths. Heavy breaths are a sure sign that you’re nervous.
32. Be sure to nod your head so the person you’re speaking with knows you’re listening and interested.

What not to do:

33. Massaging your temples shows you’re either at your wits’ end or that you have a severe headache.
34. Don’t swallow too often; it gives away the fact that you’re not comfortable with the situation.
35. Yawning is an involuntary sign from your body saying that your brain’s bored. You may not have control over it, but yawning in the middle of a conversation will give away the fact that you’d rather be somewhere else.
36. A blank face conveys either disinterest or a lack of understanding.

Walking into the limelight…

Carrying yourself in a confident manner is key to commanding respect. Give the impression that you’re walking with a purpose so

that you’ll be admired by others.

What to do:

37. Walk, don’t run. Take even strides.
38. Look ahead or in front of you, not at the floor when you walk.

What not to do:

39. Don’t walk with a swagger; it indicates that you’re cocky and have an attitude.
40. Be careful not to shove people aside as you move across a crowded place: no one respects a rude person.
41. Similarly, avoid stepping on others’ toes.

Win, hands down…

Hand gestures are great for getting attention or making a point, but be sure that you’re not creating a distraction. You want attention to be on your eyes and face while speaking, not on what your hands are doing. Command respect and control the interest of the conversation by keeping your hands in check.

What to do:

42. Open, face-up palms signal honesty and straightforwardness.
43. Gesturing with your arms can help you make a point, but don’t do so much that it’s distracting.
44. When you stroke your chin, it shows you’re trying to make a decision. Be sure that you want others to know that’s what you’re doing.
45. Making a steeple out of your hands makes a good impression, as it demonstrates confidence.
46. Shake hands firmly: not too tight or too limp. You don’t want to crush the other person’s hands or come across as unsure of yourself.
47. If the situation calls for paperwork, be sure to keep your papers in order with easy access to avoid looking disorganized.
48. Make sure your palms are clean and dry. Sweaty palms indicate nervousness and are a turn off for most people.
49. If you’re trying to convince someone of your sincerity, touch your open palm to your heart.
50. Rolling up your sleeves signals a casual, get-down-to-work attitude. Roll them up or down according to the situation.
51. Removing your tie, top button, or jacket to indicate you’re getting comfortable in your surroundings.

What not to do:

52. Don’t clench your fists. You’ll come off as aggressive.
53. Never point at someone, be it the person talking to you or anyone else in the room. It’s rude.
54. Don’t play or fidget with your mobile phone when someone’s talking to you. It shows avoidance and a lack of interest.
55. Don’t wring your hands: it signals despair.
56. Don’t scratch your head. You’ll come across as being unsure of yourself.
57. Don’t touch your nose, play with your hair, or rub your eyes when you’re being asked for an honest answer. They’re all signs that say you’re lying.
58. Don’t tap your fingers on a table or arms of a chair; you’ll seem anxious.
59. Don’t run your fingers through your hair. It shows frustration.
60. Don’t doodle on the notepad in front of you, as this indicates boredom.
61. Closing an open mouth with your hands shows you’re shocked at what’s been said or what you’ve seen.
62. Never bite your nails. It will make you seem nervous.
63. Don’t fidget with objects lying on the table in front of you.
64. Don’t chew on a pencil or pen when talking to someone. It’s unattractive and distracting.
65. Don’t sit with your palms on your cheeks. It shows you’re deep in thought about something else.
66. Don’t clench the arms of your chair or your handbag too tightly. You’ll portray yourself as nervous.
67. Don’t rub your hands together: it shows you’re too eager.
68. Avoid a two-handed handshake. It’s usually connected to politicians who are not very sincere.
69. Do not wipe your palms on your clothing. Use a handkerchief instead.
70. If you pull at your ear, you may indicate that you’re lying.
71. Don’t shake your fists at someone, as it is extremely aggressive.
72. Clenched fists raised in the air will indicate that you’re overjoyed or thrilled. Avoid doing this when situations call for restraint.

A matter of manners…

Practicing common courtesy is a basis for earning respect from others. If you’re rude, people will avoid talking and working with you. Be polite to ensure you’re putting your best foot forward.

What to do:

73. When you need to offer comfort, a one-armed squeeze, gentle hug, or a pat on the shoulder helps, depending on how close you are to the other person.
74. Open doors and allow others to walk before you.
75. Cough and sneeze into your hands or a handkerchief, not into the face of the people around you.

What not to do:

76. A handshake that goes on for an extended period of time may be considered inappropriate.
77. Ruffling someone’s hair may seem like you’re being genuinely affectionate, but in a formal setting, it suggests you’re being

condescending.
78. Don’t shout when you’re on the phone. Talk in a calm, volume-controlled voice.
79. Don’t huddle into a corner with your mobile phone while in a crowd of people. Get out and mingle instead. Keep your private conversations for a time when you’re alone.
80. Don’t mock someone’s mannerisms when you think they’re not watching.
81. Avoid taking a phone call when you’re in the middle of a discussion.
82. If you have a cold, don’t blow your nose loudly in public.
83. Never wipe your nose with your hands or sleeves.
84. Don’t scratch your itches, not matter how much you’re tempted to. You’ll make people wonder if you have a rash.
85. Don’t multi-task in the middle of a conversation. It doesn’t show dexterity, only callousness.
86. Don’t slam doors, no matter how angry you are.
87. Don’t snap or clap your hands to call someone over.
88. Don’t burp/belch loudly in public.
89. Don’t lick your lips too often. You may jut be wetting them, but it indicates nervousness, or worse, sexual aggression.
90. Don’t make faces or stick your tongue out behind someone’s back. It’s childish and rude.

Take a good look at yourself…

Carefully examining the way you present yourself can help you discover areas in which you may need improvement. Carefully groom your mannerisms and outward appearance to make your best impression and command respect.

What to do:

91. Practice your mannerisms in front of a mirror so that you can discover your weak areas.
92. Additionally, try videotaping your actions so you can find out where you’re going wrong.
93. Look at others who command respect and imitate their actions.
94. Look good. You don’t have to be conventionally handsome or beautiful; it’s enough to dress neatly in clothes that suit both you and the occasion.
95. Smell good. Use deodorant and perfume, but go easy on it. You don’t want to overpower the room with your scent.
96. Keep your fingernails clean. Close cropped nails show you’re neat and orderly, but if you prefer to wear them long, make sure they’re groomed neatly.
97. Wear footwear that allows you to walk comfortably to avoid making a fool of yourself.
98. Keep your work area and personal space neat and tidy. Avoid clutter and dust.

What not to do:

99. Avoid revealing, dirty or wrinkled clothing.
100. Don’t wear too much makeup. Keep it to a minimum.

101. And last, but not least, always smile. Smiles are contagious. When you smile, others can’t help but smile back and feel positively towards you. ;-)

Tuesday, December 9, 2008

How to improve oneself?

First you need to set a personal agenda, where you want to be in a certain period, like 5 years. See whether your qualification allows to do that. Next you have to see whether the work environment allows it. Obviously in IT co's it would be tough to expect so personal development time in current economic downturn related with USA biz.

People do say stick to a certain employer, which obviously you can do, if they reciprocate based on what you give to them, in taking care of you in terms of development, leadership and mentoring.

Talk to friends, and also by asking them on forums like this, make the right connections.

Look back and see how your peers and managers have perceived you as an individual, and identify the core strength and improve on it.

Good Luck.

How to improve oneself?

First you need to set a personal agenda, where you want to be in a certain period, like 5 years. See whether your qualification allows to do that. Next you have to see whether the work environment allows it. Obviously in IT co's it would be tough to expect so personal development time in current economic downturn related with USA biz.

People do say stick to a certain employer, which obviously you can do, if they reciprocate based on what you give to them, in taking care of you in terms of development, leadership and mentoring.

Talk to friends, and also by asking them on forums like this, make the right connections.

Look back and see how your peers and managers have perceived you as an individual, and identify the core strength and improve on it.

Good Luck.

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Seven Surefire ways to Communicate!

  1. Demonstrate enthusiasm - everytime “Inspiring leaders have an abundance of passion for what they do. You cannot inspire unless you’re inspired yourself. Period. Passion is something I can’t teach. You either have passion for your message or you don’t. Once you discover your passion, make sure it’s apparent to everyone within your professional circle.”
  2. Tell clearly a compelling course of action. “Inspiring leaders craft and deliver a specific, consistent, and memorable vision. A goal such as "we intend to double our sales by this time next year," is not inspiring. Neither is a long, convoluted mission statement destined to be tucked away and forgotten in a desk somewhere. A vision is a short (usually 10 words or less), vivid description of what the world will look like if your product or service succeeds.”
  3. Make sure people understand the benefit. “Always remember, it’s not about you, it’s about them. In my first class at Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, I was taught to answer the question, "Why should my readers care?" That’s the same thing you need to ask yourself constantly throughout a presentation, meeting, pitch, or any situation where persuasion takes place. Your listeners are asking themselves, what’s in this for me? Answer it. Don’t make them guess.”
  4. Give more examples till people understand. “Inspiring leaders tell memorable stories. Few business leaders appreciate the power of stories to connect with their audiences… No amount of data can replace that story… Stories connect with people on an emotional level. Tell more of them.”
  5. Make sure people ask more questions. “Inspiring leaders bring employees, customers, and colleagues into the process of building the company or service. This is especially important when trying to motivate young people. The command and control way of managing is over. Instead, today’s managers solicit input, listen for feedback, and actively incorporate what they hear. Employees want more than a paycheck. They want to know that their work is adding up to something meaningful.”
  6. Always believe it would work. “Inspiring leaders speak of a better future… Extraordinary leaders throughout history have been more optimistic than the average person. Winston Churchill exuded hope and confidence in the darkest days of World War II. Colin Powell said that optimism was the secret behind Ronald Reagan’s charisma. Powell also said that optimism is a force multiplier, meaning it has a ripple effect throughout an organization. Speak in positive, optimistic language. Be a beacon of hope.”
  7. Thanks and Good Wishes for people helps. “Inspiring leaders praise people and invest in them emotionally. Richard Branson has said that when you praise people they flourish; criticize them and they shrivel up. Praise is the easiest way to connect with people. When people receive genuine praise, their doubt diminishes and their spirits soar. Encourage people and they’ll walk through walls for you.”

Seven Surefire ways to Communicate!

  1. Demonstrate enthusiasm - everytime “Inspiring leaders have an abundance of passion for what they do. You cannot inspire unless you’re inspired yourself. Period. Passion is something I can’t teach. You either have passion for your message or you don’t. Once you discover your passion, make sure it’s apparent to everyone within your professional circle.”
  2. Tell clearly a compelling course of action. “Inspiring leaders craft and deliver a specific, consistent, and memorable vision. A goal such as "we intend to double our sales by this time next year," is not inspiring. Neither is a long, convoluted mission statement destined to be tucked away and forgotten in a desk somewhere. A vision is a short (usually 10 words or less), vivid description of what the world will look like if your product or service succeeds.”
  3. Make sure people understand the benefit. “Always remember, it’s not about you, it’s about them. In my first class at Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, I was taught to answer the question, "Why should my readers care?" That’s the same thing you need to ask yourself constantly throughout a presentation, meeting, pitch, or any situation where persuasion takes place. Your listeners are asking themselves, what’s in this for me? Answer it. Don’t make them guess.”
  4. Give more examples till people understand. “Inspiring leaders tell memorable stories. Few business leaders appreciate the power of stories to connect with their audiences… No amount of data can replace that story… Stories connect with people on an emotional level. Tell more of them.”
  5. Make sure people ask more questions. “Inspiring leaders bring employees, customers, and colleagues into the process of building the company or service. This is especially important when trying to motivate young people. The command and control way of managing is over. Instead, today’s managers solicit input, listen for feedback, and actively incorporate what they hear. Employees want more than a paycheck. They want to know that their work is adding up to something meaningful.”
  6. Always believe it would work. “Inspiring leaders speak of a better future… Extraordinary leaders throughout history have been more optimistic than the average person. Winston Churchill exuded hope and confidence in the darkest days of World War II. Colin Powell said that optimism was the secret behind Ronald Reagan’s charisma. Powell also said that optimism is a force multiplier, meaning it has a ripple effect throughout an organization. Speak in positive, optimistic language. Be a beacon of hope.”
  7. Thanks and Good Wishes for people helps. “Inspiring leaders praise people and invest in them emotionally. Richard Branson has said that when you praise people they flourish; criticize them and they shrivel up. Praise is the easiest way to connect with people. When people receive genuine praise, their doubt diminishes and their spirits soar. Encourage people and they’ll walk through walls for you.”

Friday, November 7, 2008

Baggage and some points on Project Activities

All project activities don't have baggage and no challenges that you may face in your project.... :-)) Here are some really stupid, incomprehensible and unintelligent suggestions!
  • Managing change in project, scope-creeping and changes that are not handled in a systematic fashion. Hah...
  • Non-constructive work environments, racial abuse included (like Indians getting abused in USA, but still they work 'coz Money dude!)
  • Not getting right balance between when to make decisions stupidly and simply make the decision yourself, by each guy in team! Duh!
  • Get good metrics fudged for project success which is an all roudn effort!
  • Getting BAD customer requirements, balancing cost of project expectation, poor quality and time. This usually centers on the client requirements communicated but the usual issue is what he has not communicated.
  • Poor motivation of the team, is a problem but when it becomes an issue, projects may miss their deadlines and you are out of business.
  • Communication issues – Email, Talk, Documents and Heresay(!)
  • Indecent behaviour with team members, with lots of smirks around owing to hygiene, food habits (cut that Garlic dude!) etc.
  • :-)) Dont ask, if you dont succeed. Start a company called Enron!

Baggage and some points on Project Activities

All project activities don't have baggage and no challenges that you may face in your project.... :-)) Here are some really stupid, incomprehensible and unintelligent suggestions!
  • Managing change in project, scope-creeping and changes that are not handled in a systematic fashion. Hah...
  • Non-constructive work environments, racial abuse included (like Indians getting abused in USA, but still they work 'coz Money dude!)
  • Not getting right balance between when to make decisions stupidly and simply make the decision yourself, by each guy in team! Duh!
  • Get good metrics fudged for project success which is an all roudn effort!
  • Getting BAD customer requirements, balancing cost of project expectation, poor quality and time. This usually centers on the client requirements communicated but the usual issue is what he has not communicated.
  • Poor motivation of the team, is a problem but when it becomes an issue, projects may miss their deadlines and you are out of business.
  • Communication issues – Email, Talk, Documents and Heresay(!)
  • Indecent behaviour with team members, with lots of smirks around owing to hygiene, food habits (cut that Garlic dude!) etc.
  • :-)) Dont ask, if you dont succeed. Start a company called Enron!

21 ways to assure quality in everything you do (50th Post!)

Doing everything with quality increases your chances for success, enhances your reputation and saves you time in the long run. People typically equate quality with skill, but quality is a by product of time, thoughts and systems.

Here are 21 ways to assure quality in everything you do. See where you can apply a couple of these rules to your life. In a few weeks, review the impact.

Review

* Review Everything
Review everything you touch before you hand it off. Proof read your documents one last time, double check that package to make sure everything is included, triple check your bullet points on your presentation.

* Review Help: Enlist a 2nd set of eyes
Even after you look things over, you may miss some glaring mistakes because you are used to your work. Having someone else look it over will give you a new perspective on your work and may even lead to new, better solutions.

* Review Other's Contributions
Don't take it for granted that others can do the job well or even that they know what they're doing. Trust but verify. Remember the saying, "Don't expect what you don't inspect."

* Review your mistakes
Sometimes you make mistakes. Learn from them and move on.

* Review Accomplishments
A lot can be learned from your past accomplishments. Take the the time to go over your past work and look objectively at what you did well and didn't do so well. There are many lessons to learn.

Control

* Control Your Task List- Don't Drop Anything
Keep track of your commitments. If you don't know what you need to do, you can't do it well.

* Control Your Commitments: Just Say No
With a heavy workload, it may be hard to get everything done right. This may mean saying no to new projects.

* Control Your Understanding
Find out deadlines and requirements. Ask questions. Make sure you know what's expected. If you don't know what you're shooting for you can't succeed.

* Control Expectations
Provide feedback at the beginning of a project of what you will be delivering. Set the scope of the project early so there aren't any misunderstandings.

* Control Yourself
Don't try to do everything yourself at one time. Break projects apart and succeed through layering one success on top of another. This will enable you provide progress and ensure you are on the right track.

Learn

* Learn From Others
The people around you may be doing some tasks better than you. How are they doing it? Look at colleagues, bosses and definitely don't neglect learning from subordinates.

* Learn Through Research
Look at industry groups, books and blogs- all may have some good tips on helping you do better.

* Learn Through Education
Are there ways to enhance your skills? Take an extra course? How can you learn more?

* Relearn
If you frequently do a task but it isn't consistently perfect, take some time to analyze the steps you should be doing. Start the process from scratch. Consciously do one step at a time making sure you're doing it right.

Think

* Commit to Quality
Decide that with anything you do, you'll do it the right way. Just committing to quality will cause you to reconsider sending out a half-baked project and increase your quality.

* Brainstorm
Think of ways you can do it better. Think of ways to put systems around your tasks.

* Envision Success
Ask yourself "What would perfect execution look like for this task?" Now go do it.

* Be Proud of Your Quality
If you take pride in your quality, you won't release non-quality items.

* Solve the Problem, Not the Request
Sometimes a "simple" request is not so simple. Find out what the requester really wants, then give it to him.

* Think big picture
Don't just solve the problem by applying a quick fix. See how it fits in the big picture and determine if you san solve a big problem with just a little more effort.

* Don't Wait for Deadlines
It's inevitable that people rush to finish a task at the deadline. This only leads to more problems. The solution is simple- start early and plan your schedule so that you finish early. Which leads to:

* Exceed expectations
You've understood the expectations and you've set expectations- now do your best to exceed them. Everyone loves good surprises!

You're not going to be able to implement this in one day but refer to this list often to ensure you're always thinking of quality. With good quality, work doesn't need to be reworked and problems are minimized.You can remember these using the mnemonic Review-TLC (TLC= Think, Learn, Control).

21 ways to assure quality in everything you do (50th Post!)

Doing everything with quality increases your chances for success, enhances your reputation and saves you time in the long run. People typically equate quality with skill, but quality is a by product of time, thoughts and systems.

Here are 21 ways to assure quality in everything you do. See where you can apply a couple of these rules to your life. In a few weeks, review the impact.

Review

* Review Everything
Review everything you touch before you hand it off. Proof read your documents one last time, double check that package to make sure everything is included, triple check your bullet points on your presentation.

* Review Help: Enlist a 2nd set of eyes
Even after you look things over, you may miss some glaring mistakes because you are used to your work. Having someone else look it over will give you a new perspective on your work and may even lead to new, better solutions.

* Review Other's Contributions
Don't take it for granted that others can do the job well or even that they know what they're doing. Trust but verify. Remember the saying, "Don't expect what you don't inspect."

* Review your mistakes
Sometimes you make mistakes. Learn from them and move on.

* Review Accomplishments
A lot can be learned from your past accomplishments. Take the the time to go over your past work and look objectively at what you did well and didn't do so well. There are many lessons to learn.

Control

* Control Your Task List- Don't Drop Anything
Keep track of your commitments. If you don't know what you need to do, you can't do it well.

* Control Your Commitments: Just Say No
With a heavy workload, it may be hard to get everything done right. This may mean saying no to new projects.

* Control Your Understanding
Find out deadlines and requirements. Ask questions. Make sure you know what's expected. If you don't know what you're shooting for you can't succeed.

* Control Expectations
Provide feedback at the beginning of a project of what you will be delivering. Set the scope of the project early so there aren't any misunderstandings.

* Control Yourself
Don't try to do everything yourself at one time. Break projects apart and succeed through layering one success on top of another. This will enable you provide progress and ensure you are on the right track.

Learn

* Learn From Others
The people around you may be doing some tasks better than you. How are they doing it? Look at colleagues, bosses and definitely don't neglect learning from subordinates.

* Learn Through Research
Look at industry groups, books and blogs- all may have some good tips on helping you do better.

* Learn Through Education
Are there ways to enhance your skills? Take an extra course? How can you learn more?

* Relearn
If you frequently do a task but it isn't consistently perfect, take some time to analyze the steps you should be doing. Start the process from scratch. Consciously do one step at a time making sure you're doing it right.

Think

* Commit to Quality
Decide that with anything you do, you'll do it the right way. Just committing to quality will cause you to reconsider sending out a half-baked project and increase your quality.

* Brainstorm
Think of ways you can do it better. Think of ways to put systems around your tasks.

* Envision Success
Ask yourself "What would perfect execution look like for this task?" Now go do it.

* Be Proud of Your Quality
If you take pride in your quality, you won't release non-quality items.

* Solve the Problem, Not the Request
Sometimes a "simple" request is not so simple. Find out what the requester really wants, then give it to him.

* Think big picture
Don't just solve the problem by applying a quick fix. See how it fits in the big picture and determine if you san solve a big problem with just a little more effort.

* Don't Wait for Deadlines
It's inevitable that people rush to finish a task at the deadline. This only leads to more problems. The solution is simple- start early and plan your schedule so that you finish early. Which leads to:

* Exceed expectations
You've understood the expectations and you've set expectations- now do your best to exceed them. Everyone loves good surprises!

You're not going to be able to implement this in one day but refer to this list often to ensure you're always thinking of quality. With good quality, work doesn't need to be reworked and problems are minimized.You can remember these using the mnemonic Review-TLC (TLC= Think, Learn, Control).

Friday, October 31, 2008

Six Attributes of Leadership

Six Attributes of Leadership

Does leadership have an effect on success? Is there a difference between management and leadership? Can leadership be learned? The answer to all these questions is yes. In this article, I will look at six attributes of project/program leadership. This is certainly not a complete list, just a start - one that I believe can help leaders achieve success.

1. Lateral thinking

The first attribute, lateral thinking, covers a variety of methods to get us out of the usual line of thought. It is this kind of thinking that cuts across the instilled and predetermined patterns we all too often employ when working on a problem. With this type of thinking we try different perceptions, different concepts and different points of view, as well as consider multiple possibilities and approaches. This does not mean that we automatically forget the way things have been; it means that we make sure we consider all options: the simple to the complex, the direct and indirect, and the straight and the circular path, leaving no stone unturned. Many problems we face as project and program managers and leaders require different perspectives to solve them successfully.

2. Empowerment

Often, there is little or no recognition for people who spend time on elementary problems - it's the big problems that receive all the attention. Yet, big problems usually start as minor problems. Because of personal and interpersonal attitudes of the leader, participants may develop the habit of ignoring problems until they explode, at which time they become big problems. Then, leaders want to go on record for being a problem solver. Heroics like this not only tend to be self centered, they can take away from the work of members. Empowered project teams correct this attitude. They focus on getting the job done while solving or preventing problems while they are still minor.

The ultimate paradox of leadership power is that to be an effective leader, one must turn all team members into leaders. In this way, relationships and the issues of leadership and empowerment become important. Successful leaders are able to motivate, to energize and to empower others by giving the team the authority, responsibility, tools and resources it needs. When people are excited and empowered, it affects both their task initiation and task persistence. That is, empowered people get more involved, take on more difficult situations, deal with issues as soon as possible and act more confidently. Empowered people expend more effort on a given task and are more persistent in their efforts.

3. Optimism

The third attribute is optimism. Leaders are optimistic. They think positively. They extend this attitude from the present to the future. Positive thinking is more than just avoiding negative emotions; there are actions and forethought involved. It is an attitude, a view to life, an orientation. It manifests in the successful leader's words, actions, relationships and values. When negative events happen, excellent leaders purposefully look for something positive. Instead of feeling that they can't do something, they look at the problem as an opportunity for their and the team's development and growth.

4. Demand better

On-going self-assessment and self-evaluation are critical for ensuring growth for an individual and the team. It helps the leader and the team to meet objectives and have a positive impact. Demanding better is actually a simple idea; all one has to do is ask, "What are we doing now and what can we do even better?" Humans actually need to grow, it is vital to life! The process is based on feedback, self-awareness, openness and trust. Essentially, that's all there is to it. Asking the question over and over again focuses leaders on challenging themselves and team members. Further, it sets into motion an on-going self-evaluation and a focus on the development process of achievement. In return, this focus on the process brings positive results and eventually becomes a normal part of everyday life.

5. Encourage delegation

Delegation is one of the most important roles of a leader's job; the excellent leader's job isn't 'to do,' it is to gain or accomplish things through team members. The leader's time should be spent on such things as visioning, motivating, controlling and goal setting, and not on trivial jobs such as fighting fires or responding to interruptions and correcting errors.

Delegating relieves time-pressures, it provides the time to vision and create. It provides team members with an opportunity to expand their own skills in decision making and problem solving and encourages their creativity and initiative; it gives them the necessary ingredients for growth. At the same time, it motivates them to become what they are capable of being.

It forces the leader to spend time with team members, thus developing interpersonal relationships and skills. The feedback and attention will encourage team members on to greater things. It helps set performance standards based on member's accomplishments or results rather than purely on their activity and helps to increase results by releasing the leader from some day-to-day activities. Delegating allows the leader to step back and take a look at the bigger picture rather than get caught-up in the internal activities of the organization. The leader will then be able to think outwards for the better of the organization and not lose sight of the real goals.

6. Reside in the future

To meet future challenges, leaders must reside in the future. Only then can leaders set a vision with reasonable goals and promote the process of developing effective strategies to achieve them. Considering the future enables leaders to think constructively about it and, along with team members, do the things that contribute to achieving visions. Proactive future-oriented thinking can lead to greater team and organizational success. The future will happen, no matter what we do. If one wants a successful future, one needs to work at it.

A successful organization has a successful leader who demonstrates these traits:

  • Lateral thinking
  • Empowerment
  • Are optimistic
  • Demand better
  • Encourage delegation
  • Reside in the future

Six Attributes of Leadership

Six Attributes of Leadership

Does leadership have an effect on success? Is there a difference between management and leadership? Can leadership be learned? The answer to all these questions is yes. In this article, I will look at six attributes of project/program leadership. This is certainly not a complete list, just a start - one that I believe can help leaders achieve success.

1. Lateral thinking

The first attribute, lateral thinking, covers a variety of methods to get us out of the usual line of thought. It is this kind of thinking that cuts across the instilled and predetermined patterns we all too often employ when working on a problem. With this type of thinking we try different perceptions, different concepts and different points of view, as well as consider multiple possibilities and approaches. This does not mean that we automatically forget the way things have been; it means that we make sure we consider all options: the simple to the complex, the direct and indirect, and the straight and the circular path, leaving no stone unturned. Many problems we face as project and program managers and leaders require different perspectives to solve them successfully.

2. Empowerment

Often, there is little or no recognition for people who spend time on elementary problems - it's the big problems that receive all the attention. Yet, big problems usually start as minor problems. Because of personal and interpersonal attitudes of the leader, participants may develop the habit of ignoring problems until they explode, at which time they become big problems. Then, leaders want to go on record for being a problem solver. Heroics like this not only tend to be self centered, they can take away from the work of members. Empowered project teams correct this attitude. They focus on getting the job done while solving or preventing problems while they are still minor.

The ultimate paradox of leadership power is that to be an effective leader, one must turn all team members into leaders. In this way, relationships and the issues of leadership and empowerment become important. Successful leaders are able to motivate, to energize and to empower others by giving the team the authority, responsibility, tools and resources it needs. When people are excited and empowered, it affects both their task initiation and task persistence. That is, empowered people get more involved, take on more difficult situations, deal with issues as soon as possible and act more confidently. Empowered people expend more effort on a given task and are more persistent in their efforts.

3. Optimism

The third attribute is optimism. Leaders are optimistic. They think positively. They extend this attitude from the present to the future. Positive thinking is more than just avoiding negative emotions; there are actions and forethought involved. It is an attitude, a view to life, an orientation. It manifests in the successful leader's words, actions, relationships and values. When negative events happen, excellent leaders purposefully look for something positive. Instead of feeling that they can't do something, they look at the problem as an opportunity for their and the team's development and growth.

4. Demand better

On-going self-assessment and self-evaluation are critical for ensuring growth for an individual and the team. It helps the leader and the team to meet objectives and have a positive impact. Demanding better is actually a simple idea; all one has to do is ask, "What are we doing now and what can we do even better?" Humans actually need to grow, it is vital to life! The process is based on feedback, self-awareness, openness and trust. Essentially, that's all there is to it. Asking the question over and over again focuses leaders on challenging themselves and team members. Further, it sets into motion an on-going self-evaluation and a focus on the development process of achievement. In return, this focus on the process brings positive results and eventually becomes a normal part of everyday life.

5. Encourage delegation

Delegation is one of the most important roles of a leader's job; the excellent leader's job isn't 'to do,' it is to gain or accomplish things through team members. The leader's time should be spent on such things as visioning, motivating, controlling and goal setting, and not on trivial jobs such as fighting fires or responding to interruptions and correcting errors.

Delegating relieves time-pressures, it provides the time to vision and create. It provides team members with an opportunity to expand their own skills in decision making and problem solving and encourages their creativity and initiative; it gives them the necessary ingredients for growth. At the same time, it motivates them to become what they are capable of being.

It forces the leader to spend time with team members, thus developing interpersonal relationships and skills. The feedback and attention will encourage team members on to greater things. It helps set performance standards based on member's accomplishments or results rather than purely on their activity and helps to increase results by releasing the leader from some day-to-day activities. Delegating allows the leader to step back and take a look at the bigger picture rather than get caught-up in the internal activities of the organization. The leader will then be able to think outwards for the better of the organization and not lose sight of the real goals.

6. Reside in the future

To meet future challenges, leaders must reside in the future. Only then can leaders set a vision with reasonable goals and promote the process of developing effective strategies to achieve them. Considering the future enables leaders to think constructively about it and, along with team members, do the things that contribute to achieving visions. Proactive future-oriented thinking can lead to greater team and organizational success. The future will happen, no matter what we do. If one wants a successful future, one needs to work at it.

A successful organization has a successful leader who demonstrates these traits:

  • Lateral thinking
  • Empowerment
  • Are optimistic
  • Demand better
  • Encourage delegation
  • Reside in the future

Friday, October 17, 2008

A Good Product Manager

Here is nice article you should read!

http://www.goodproductmanager.com/2008/09/25/lack-of-complaints-does-not-equal-success/

Interesting!

Dont come back to me saying that the article wasnt good. It was my view! :-))

A Good Product Manager

Here is nice article you should read!

http://www.goodproductmanager.com/2008/09/25/lack-of-complaints-does-not-equal-success/

Interesting!

Dont come back to me saying that the article wasnt good. It was my view! :-))

Wednesday, October 1, 2008

Shiv Khera : Fire of Motivation

Fire of Motivation

I believe in two premises:

(i) most people are good people, but can do better; and
(ii) most people already know what to do, so why aren't they doing it?

What is missing is the spark--motivation. Some self help books adopt
the approach of teaching what to do; we take a different approach. We
ask, "Why don't you do it?" If you ask people on the street what
should be done, they will give you all the correct answers. But ask
them whether they are doing it and the answer will be no. What is
lacking is motivation.

The greatest motivation comes from a person's belief system. That means he
needs to believe in what he does and accept responsibility. That is
where motivation becomes important. When people accept responsibility
for their behavior and actions, their attitude toward life becomes
positive. They become more productive, personally and professionally.
Their relationships improve both at home and at work. Life becomes
more meaningful and fulfilled.

After a person's basic physical needs are met, emotional needs become
a bigger motivator. Every behavior comes out of the "pain or gain"
principle. If the gain is greater than the pain, that is the
motivator. If the pain is greater than the gain, then that is a
deterrent.

Gains can be tangible, such as: monetary rewards, vacations, and
gifts. They can be intangible, such as: recognition, appreciation,
sense of achievement, promotion, growth, responsibility, sense of
fulfillment, self worth, accomplishment, and belief.

Inspiration is changing thinking; motivation is changing action.

Motivation is like fire unless you keep adding fuel to it, it dies.
Just like exercise and food don't last long, neither does motivation.
However, if the source of motivation is belief in inner values, it
becomes long--lasting.

- Shiv Khera

(He has started a Political party to save some big barons money ....
Black to White? What is the Fire of Motivation?)

Shiv Khera : Fire of Motivation

Fire of Motivation

I believe in two premises:

(i) most people are good people, but can do better; and
(ii) most people already know what to do, so why aren't they doing it?

What is missing is the spark--motivation. Some self help books adopt
the approach of teaching what to do; we take a different approach. We
ask, "Why don't you do it?" If you ask people on the street what
should be done, they will give you all the correct answers. But ask
them whether they are doing it and the answer will be no. What is
lacking is motivation.

The greatest motivation comes from a person's belief system. That means he
needs to believe in what he does and accept responsibility. That is
where motivation becomes important. When people accept responsibility
for their behavior and actions, their attitude toward life becomes
positive. They become more productive, personally and professionally.
Their relationships improve both at home and at work. Life becomes
more meaningful and fulfilled.

After a person's basic physical needs are met, emotional needs become
a bigger motivator. Every behavior comes out of the "pain or gain"
principle. If the gain is greater than the pain, that is the
motivator. If the pain is greater than the gain, then that is a
deterrent.

Gains can be tangible, such as: monetary rewards, vacations, and
gifts. They can be intangible, such as: recognition, appreciation,
sense of achievement, promotion, growth, responsibility, sense of
fulfillment, self worth, accomplishment, and belief.

Inspiration is changing thinking; motivation is changing action.

Motivation is like fire unless you keep adding fuel to it, it dies.
Just like exercise and food don't last long, neither does motivation.
However, if the source of motivation is belief in inner values, it
becomes long--lasting.

- Shiv Khera

(He has started a Political party to save some big barons money ....
Black to White? What is the Fire of Motivation?)

Monday, September 22, 2008

Welcome!

Let me talk more on the Software Development....

Friday, September 19, 2008

PMI, PMBOK and PMP

I was one of the fortunate in 2002 to get a certification in PMI, when I was having lots of time in Birmingham, I studied.

It was valid for 2 years only, and need to keep the PDU's accumulated, to be active and renew it in 2 years. Now it is 4 years with a diluted pass score (81 to 65).

Too much of theory and no one can understand how is the practical way of Project Management.

But the certification helps. Atleast the recruiters notice.

Too many coachers and coaching institutes.

Hope it helps for all.

PMI, PMBOK and PMP

I was one of the fortunate in 2002 to get a certification in PMI, when I was having lots of time in Birmingham, I studied.

It was valid for 2 years only, and need to keep the PDU's accumulated, to be active and renew it in 2 years. Now it is 4 years with a diluted pass score (81 to 65).

Too much of theory and no one can understand how is the practical way of Project Management.

But the certification helps. Atleast the recruiters notice.

Too many coachers and coaching institutes.

Hope it helps for all.

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Basix of PM

Basic of Project Management as different groups....

  1. Initiation Process Group
  2. Planning Processes Group
  3. Execution Process Group
  4. Controlling Processes Group
  5. Closing Processes Group
Well I hate the first. And also the second. And also the third. :-)

But as a true Manager, I like the 4th and the 5th, and quite like to question 1, 2 and 3.

Source - PMI.org and my own experience

Basix of PM

Basic of Project Management as different groups....

  1. Initiation Process Group
  2. Planning Processes Group
  3. Execution Process Group
  4. Controlling Processes Group
  5. Closing Processes Group
Well I hate the first. And also the second. And also the third. :-)

But as a true Manager, I like the 4th and the 5th, and quite like to question 1, 2 and 3.

Source - PMI.org and my own experience

Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Creativity

1) In corporate contexts, societies and countries having environments suitable for engendering useful creativity, is instrumental having an influential leadership with the courage, willingness and passion to get through an inspiring vision to be followed for engaged and committed professionals working in projects which outcomes may be beneficial for an enterprise, community or society.

2) Companies that are leaders in innovation typically encourage an creative mindset as integral part of a corporate culture where true collaboration, effective knowledge sharing and systematic practices of innovation are fostered, supported and developed by the influential action from Senior Management who believe faithfully in the value of promoting innovation to achieve competitiveness in a business context highly volatile and uncertain.

3) The most innovative companies apply an aggressive policy of incentives when rewarding and recognizing those ideas with the potential of becoming in innovative products and services. Google, offers the opportunity to its engineers of using 20% of their working time to create, promote and develop personal projects of innovation. This practice of nurturing environments of useful creativity may be similarly applied in universities, societies and countries with minor modifications and additions to produce true innovations of great commercial value.

4) Those companies, societies and countries that have created state-of-the-art environments to nurture processes of useful creativity consider that the investments in education, training and capacitation are the key strategies to empower, motivate and engage the best talents around important projects with transformational value for a company, country and society. The companies that excel in this discipline have developed systematically as part of their Employer Brand Management practices career exciting development plans and excellent succession plans to assure that human talent relevant to the corporate projects will have the right mix of knowledge, skills and competences to succeed in today´s highly demanding and competitive business context.

5) The professionals who generate, share, disseminate and improve by applying their creativity the knowledge relevant in investigation projects and transformational projects to produce innovative theories, processes, products and services are the main asset of a company, society, community and country where the strategic guideline of encouraging, supporting and promoting environments propitious to apply creativity and transform it in useful innovation is enthusiastically encouraged, visibly supported and explicitly promoted by the incumbent leadership.

Creativity

1) In corporate contexts, societies and countries having environments suitable for engendering useful creativity, is instrumental having an influential leadership with the courage, willingness and passion to get through an inspiring vision to be followed for engaged and committed professionals working in projects which outcomes may be beneficial for an enterprise, community or society.

2) Companies that are leaders in innovation typically encourage an creative mindset as integral part of a corporate culture where true collaboration, effective knowledge sharing and systematic practices of innovation are fostered, supported and developed by the influential action from Senior Management who believe faithfully in the value of promoting innovation to achieve competitiveness in a business context highly volatile and uncertain.

3) The most innovative companies apply an aggressive policy of incentives when rewarding and recognizing those ideas with the potential of becoming in innovative products and services. Google, offers the opportunity to its engineers of using 20% of their working time to create, promote and develop personal projects of innovation. This practice of nurturing environments of useful creativity may be similarly applied in universities, societies and countries with minor modifications and additions to produce true innovations of great commercial value.

4) Those companies, societies and countries that have created state-of-the-art environments to nurture processes of useful creativity consider that the investments in education, training and capacitation are the key strategies to empower, motivate and engage the best talents around important projects with transformational value for a company, country and society. The companies that excel in this discipline have developed systematically as part of their Employer Brand Management practices career exciting development plans and excellent succession plans to assure that human talent relevant to the corporate projects will have the right mix of knowledge, skills and competences to succeed in today´s highly demanding and competitive business context.

5) The professionals who generate, share, disseminate and improve by applying their creativity the knowledge relevant in investigation projects and transformational projects to produce innovative theories, processes, products and services are the main asset of a company, society, community and country where the strategic guideline of encouraging, supporting and promoting environments propitious to apply creativity and transform it in useful innovation is enthusiastically encouraged, visibly supported and explicitly promoted by the incumbent leadership.

Friday, August 29, 2008

Art of Interviewing

Recently I was interviewing some candidates for a Senior Level position for the new venture that I have started.

I was happy and comfortable to deal with managers, with 3 to 4 years of leadership experience, and very good technology hands-on approach. This was going from the tradition of looking at more expeience, which would cost more money, that a startup venture cannot afford.

With more than 18 years and also with the experience of handling labours in my Father's factory, I believe that was a right choice. Social designation would be there and I expect the sincerity of candidates to show that they are capable. We are willing to pay the right money for the right candidate with right experience.

I interviewed so many candidates, mostly referrals from friends, and they were taking it so light.

One guy a development manager in a financial software co. based out of USA at Bangalore (In...t), talked to me once for the job. Now the badger starts. He is keeping on calling me and this has become a pain now to answer him. I couldn't just cut him off. He threw a new ball doosra at me saying that "I am ready to take a plunge in untested waters ...","I am actually the key guy in this company, and willing to leave it for you.." etc etc

Tell me should I hire this candidate? Or based on his attitude, should I report to his manager, who happens to be a good friend of mine? Time would tell.

Art of Interviewing

Recently I was interviewing some candidates for a Senior Level position for the new venture that I have started.

I was happy and comfortable to deal with managers, with 3 to 4 years of leadership experience, and very good technology hands-on approach. This was going from the tradition of looking at more expeience, which would cost more money, that a startup venture cannot afford.

With more than 18 years and also with the experience of handling labours in my Father's factory, I believe that was a right choice. Social designation would be there and I expect the sincerity of candidates to show that they are capable. We are willing to pay the right money for the right candidate with right experience.

I interviewed so many candidates, mostly referrals from friends, and they were taking it so light.

One guy a development manager in a financial software co. based out of USA at Bangalore (In...t), talked to me once for the job. Now the badger starts. He is keeping on calling me and this has become a pain now to answer him. I couldn't just cut him off. He threw a new ball doosra at me saying that "I am ready to take a plunge in untested waters ...","I am actually the key guy in this company, and willing to leave it for you.." etc etc

Tell me should I hire this candidate? Or based on his attitude, should I report to his manager, who happens to be a good friend of mine? Time would tell.

Thursday, August 28, 2008

Motivation

The Motivation Mistakes Managers Make

I. Too much emphasis on pay, benefits, and perks:

The Saratoga Institute reports that 88% of employees voluntarily leave their jobs for other reasons, such as misalignment of mutual expectations, person-job mismatch, insufficient coaching and feedback, perception of poor career-advancement prospects, work-life imbalance, and both distrust toward and low confidence in senior leadership. Still, most managers refuse to acknowledge the "push" factors, preferring to see the "pull" factor of more money as the prime motivator.

The truth is, both push and pull factors come into play, but companies make a big mistake by hanging their employee-retention strategies solely on the easier-to-manipulate tangible factors of more pay, better benefits, and flashier perks. It's not that these factors are unimportant; they're very important. In fact, most employers of choice typically offer better pay and benefits than their competitors. But what sets them apart are positive, caring cultures where most managers know how to provide the everyday coaching, feedback, and recognition that keep employees engaged.

II. Blindly following other companies' best practices:
One of the disadvantages of reading Fortune magazine's "100 Best Places to Work in America" list each year is that we become so enamored of great employers that we think their best practices will work equally well for our companies. Sometimes they do, but often they don't.

The best employers thoughtfully match their cultures, benefits, and management practices to the needs and desires of their workers. FedEx gears its workplace to the short-term work-experience needs of younger part-timers, while American Express focuses on long-term career development with a strong emphasis on gender equity. SAS Institute has created an employment brand that says, "Come to work for us and enjoy a campus-like environment, and have a life outside of work." This software-development company is famous for its 3% turnover rate in an industry where 20% is the norm.

Most companies can't-or won't-invest the up-front dollars to do what SAS has done. The good news is they don't have to. But by asking their particular workforce what they most want and need, companies can usually provide what it takes to keep employees-and keep them engaged.

The danger of benchmarking against others in your industry is that it may keep you from tailoring an innovative benefit or practice to meet the needs of the 20% of the talent that's creating 80% of the value in your company or department.

III. Failure to train managers and hold them accountable:
Studies of employee turnover consistently show that the direct supervisor builds or destroys employee commitment. Yet, how many companies select executives for their ability to manage people, train them in effective people-management skills, and then hold them accountable? You could probably count those on the fingers of one hand.

Many employers of choice carefully monitor their managers' voluntary-turnover rates, new-hire retention rates, and employee-engagement survey scores, and reward those who score highly with bigger bonuses. Managers with low scores get lower bonuses and are called into meeting with their superiors, which may lead to more training, coaching, reassignment, or termination.

In other words, smart companies know that as the competition for talent heats up, they can no longer afford the luxury of another bad manager.

Motivation

The Motivation Mistakes Managers Make

I. Too much emphasis on pay, benefits, and perks:

The Saratoga Institute reports that 88% of employees voluntarily leave their jobs for other reasons, such as misalignment of mutual expectations, person-job mismatch, insufficient coaching and feedback, perception of poor career-advancement prospects, work-life imbalance, and both distrust toward and low confidence in senior leadership. Still, most managers refuse to acknowledge the "push" factors, preferring to see the "pull" factor of more money as the prime motivator.

The truth is, both push and pull factors come into play, but companies make a big mistake by hanging their employee-retention strategies solely on the easier-to-manipulate tangible factors of more pay, better benefits, and flashier perks. It's not that these factors are unimportant; they're very important. In fact, most employers of choice typically offer better pay and benefits than their competitors. But what sets them apart are positive, caring cultures where most managers know how to provide the everyday coaching, feedback, and recognition that keep employees engaged.

II. Blindly following other companies' best practices:
One of the disadvantages of reading Fortune magazine's "100 Best Places to Work in America" list each year is that we become so enamored of great employers that we think their best practices will work equally well for our companies. Sometimes they do, but often they don't.

The best employers thoughtfully match their cultures, benefits, and management practices to the needs and desires of their workers. FedEx gears its workplace to the short-term work-experience needs of younger part-timers, while American Express focuses on long-term career development with a strong emphasis on gender equity. SAS Institute has created an employment brand that says, "Come to work for us and enjoy a campus-like environment, and have a life outside of work." This software-development company is famous for its 3% turnover rate in an industry where 20% is the norm.

Most companies can't-or won't-invest the up-front dollars to do what SAS has done. The good news is they don't have to. But by asking their particular workforce what they most want and need, companies can usually provide what it takes to keep employees-and keep them engaged.

The danger of benchmarking against others in your industry is that it may keep you from tailoring an innovative benefit or practice to meet the needs of the 20% of the talent that's creating 80% of the value in your company or department.

III. Failure to train managers and hold them accountable:
Studies of employee turnover consistently show that the direct supervisor builds or destroys employee commitment. Yet, how many companies select executives for their ability to manage people, train them in effective people-management skills, and then hold them accountable? You could probably count those on the fingers of one hand.

Many employers of choice carefully monitor their managers' voluntary-turnover rates, new-hire retention rates, and employee-engagement survey scores, and reward those who score highly with bigger bonuses. Managers with low scores get lower bonuses and are called into meeting with their superiors, which may lead to more training, coaching, reassignment, or termination.

In other words, smart companies know that as the competition for talent heats up, they can no longer afford the luxury of another bad manager.

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

Reputation

Found this article on net, published in 2 or 3 websites. Nice one!

When you' join a company for the first time, you want to establish a good reputation, and that's especially true if you're a new professional in the workforce.

Below are several tactics that should complete your game plan for winning favor and starting a good foundation for your career.

Earn Respect Before a Special Request

Life sometimes gets in the way of everything, including work. On occasion you may need to ask your boss for an extra privilege -- but it's best not to do so straight out of the gate.

Hallie Crawford, a certified career coach and owner of HallieCrawford.com, agrees. She says, "This generation has been pegged as one that expects everything up front at the beginning. That's not always accurate, but new graduates should remember that they'll have to pay their dues before they can have it all."

She recommends adhering to company policies and endearing yourself to your boss before asking for flexibility. "You want to prove that you perform well and it's worth it to keep you content," reveals Crawford. So, if your hours are nine to five, make sure you're at your desk at nine and at least until five. Down the road, after you've demonstrated your reliability and value to your boss, you may be able to negotiate more flexibility in your arrival and departure times or lunch hour or take a vacation before you're technically due one.

Tackle Something Without Being Asked

One of the best ways to gain the gratitude of your supervisor is showing initiative. "So many people get into a new job and think their supervisors are going to say, 'This is exactly what I expect you to do.' But this isn't school. You're not going to get clear-cut homework assignments. You have to ask, 'What can I help with?' or you can just dive into a task," shares Crawford, whose practice is based in Atlanta.

She recommends taking on a project that everyone is avoiding. Perhaps the supply closet is a shambles. Or there's a major backlog at an important filing cabinet. Maybe an important database is woefully out of date. Put in a few extra minutes each day so your pet project doesn't interfere with your primary responsibilities. When you're done, you'll have won your boss's admiration and your coworkers' gratitude. "You have to step up if you want to get ahead," states Crawford.

Offer Opinions With Tact

You've been hired because your boss and others at the company saw promise in you and your skills. Your opinion is valuable to the organization's growth and future. However, remember to offer it up gently and with respect. Crawford reminds new grads, "Blurting out things as if you're a seasoned consultant isn't the best approach. It's great that you have a fresh perspective, but you need to present it in the right way."

Rather than inquiring why something is done a certain way, ask if management has ever considered doing it another way. Suggesting a new process rather than questioning a current one highlights your forward thinking without insulting your boss's or the company's approach. "You don't want to come off as a know-it-all," she says.

It's Business, Not Personal

Work friends can become some of your best friends, in and out of the office. But, as Crawford reminds her clients, "You need to remember that these are professional relationships first." Even if you work for a hip company where fun is a part of the company culture, she says, "It's not a frat party."

If you're invited out to lunch or an after-work drink, don't overindulge in alcohol and don't be an "over-sharer." "You have to be smart," says Crawford. "If you don't want other people to know about it, don't do or say it." Over time you'll learn a lot about your coworkers and they you, but it will happen organically.

Figure It Out

It's important to ask a lot of questions when you're new to any job, and your boss understands that. But don't pepper her with queries all day long. Crawford points out, "You have to know when you need to go to your boss and when you don't. She's really busy and can't always hold your hand."

Crawford urges new employees to learn to work independently of their supervisors by reaching out to other key people related to their jobs and get to know them. Your supervisor will appreciate the fact that you've figured out how things work and that you've begun to build relationships throughout the company. Adds Crawford, "You don't want to keep falling back on the fact that you're new -- because that gets old."